Free Digital Inclusions Seminars

We are happy to announce we are running two sessions with BrowseAloud in Melbourne on Tuesday and one session with our partner Reading Room in Canberra on Thursday.

Melbourne – 16th April

RSVP

Please confirm your attendance to Shauna McCollum s.mccollum@browsealoud.com, outlining which session you would like to attend and any special dietary requirements, to ensure that we have plenty of food to go around on the day. Please note there is no cost for either session. Breakfast and lunch are complementary.

Session 1

08:00 – 08:30: Registration and Refreshments (Tea/Coffee/Pastry)

08:30 – 09:30: Welcome and Introductions

Presentation: Mobile & Accessibility
Gian Wild, Director, Accessibility Oz

Presentation: Removing Mobile Barriers
David Robinson, General Manager, BrowseAloud
Kelly McCoy, Business Development Manager, BrowseAloud

09:30 – 10:30: Complimentary Round Table Breakfast

Session 2

Please note that Session 2 is a repeat of Session 1.

11:00 – 11:30: Registration and Refreshments (Tea/Coffee)

11:30 – 12:30: Welcome and Introductions

Presentation: Mobile & Accessibility
Gian Wild, Director, Accessibility Oz

Presentation: Removing Mobile Barriers
David Robinson, General Manager, BrowseAloud
Kelly McCoy, Business Development Manager, BrowseAloud

12:30 – 13:30: Complimentary Round Table Lunch

About the presentations

Mobile & Accessibility

We’ve been making web sites accessible for many years now, but how do you make sure that your mobile web site is responsive and accessible? Gian Wild will cover the important accessibility issues raised when viewing a site on a mobile device – and not all of them are covered in WCAG2.

Removing Mobile Barriers

BrowseAloud provides worldwide leadership in online reading support for websites. More than 7,000 websites are using BrowseAloud products to reach a much wider audience than ever before, comply with legal obligations and gain a return on investment. During his presentation, David Robinson will highlight the challenges to digital inclusion, what barriers exist on the mobile web and how they can be broken down. He will explore how this cutting edge solution can offer help for Society’s most vulnerable groups by empowering them to both communicate with greater freedom and access online services independently.

Canberra – 18th April

Registrations still open!

AccessibilityOz, in partnership with Reading Room and BrowseAloud are pleased to bring you our free Digital Conversations breakfast. Australian Government legislation requires websites to meet a set of WCAG 2.0 standards on delivering accessible website by the end of 2013. Most of you are aware of the requirements, but how does this actually translate to quantifiable actions that you can take? Through our informative speakers, let us guide you as to your obligations under WCAG 2.0, what makes a site AA or AAA, and learn about the actions you can take to ensure the work you do from today is structured in a way to meet these broad requirements. A full buffet breakfast will be served before the presentations.

This session is tailored for both attendees who are new to accessibility and for those who have already taken the path to delivering fully accessible websites.

We will explore:

  • The obligations and responsibilities you have under WCAG 2.0
  • Gain real world examples of what needs to be done and how to prepare from the outset
  • Hear from TextHelp about how their latest solution BrowseAloud Plus can alleviate the pressure

Location and dates

When: Thursday, 18th April
Time: 7:30am – 9:30am
Where: The North Courtyard, Hotel Realm, 18 National Circuit, Barton ACT 2600

RSVP

If you would like to join us, please RSVP at:
http://www.readingroom.com.au/news/canberra-accessibility-breakfast-briefing.aspx

About the presentations

David Pickstone, Digital Strategist, Reading Room

David Pickstone will be guiding you through the foundations of what WCAG 2.0 AA and AAA requirements mean for practical website development. While looking at the fundamentals of delivering an accessible website, you will learn about your team’s responsibilities and help you create a shift in your thinking to consider the importance of accessibility from the outset of all projects from content creation, design and functionality.

Gian Wild, Director, AccessibilityOz

Gian Wild will be speaking about how to make your mobile sites accessible. WCAG 2.0 was written before mobile devices were ubiquitous, and there are some accessibility issues unique to the mobile format, such as lack of keyboard, lack of mouse hover and reduced screen size. Gian will be talking about the most common problems and how you can avoid them.

David Robinson, General Manager, BrowseAloud – Removing Mobile Barriers

During his presentation, David Robinson will highlight the challenges to digital inclusion, what barriers exist on the mobile web and how they can be broken down. He will explore how BrowseAloud, this cutting edge solution, can offer help for Society’s most vulnerable groups by empowering them to both communicate with greater freedom and access online services independently. David’s presentation will be followed by a brief demonstration of this unique tool by Kelly McCoy, BrowseAloud BDM for Australia.

2 thoughts on “Free Digital Inclusions Seminars

  1. Richard Hayward says:

    Hi Gian,

    Thanks for the opportunity to attend the Digital Inclusion session yesterday, it was very valuable.

    I’ve had a couple of questions from your presentation.

    Can you define your position on the accessibility of Flash video on mobile devices? You said removing the Flash video on a mobile site is going to cause a problem when its serving a core purpose for your users, but wont including it cause a greater problem?

    Also, with skip to content, what role do you see this playing on a mobile site? I couldn’t see one when looking at your site via mobile. How are they useful in helping users on mobile devices.

    1. pd says:

      Flash is a terminally ill format. It is being replaced by HTML5.

      Even Mozilla has caved into the demand for supporting HTML5 video through the h264 codec.

      Proposing that sites continue supporting Flash in any form sounds very backwards to me.

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